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College flews 



Vol. 9. No. 33 



WELLESLEY, MASS., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 1910 



Price 5 Cents 



SENIOR PLAY. 



"FLOAT." 



II is a pity to dissed a beautiful Bower. 
Wc gel the beauty of the individual parts in so 
doing, but lose the beauty of the unified whole 
Similarly we object to dissecting the Senior 
play. Wc would prefer to praise the per- 
fection of the whole and leave unmentioned 
the details. Furthermore we feel infinitely 
small for the task of criticizing it. We are 
so lost in wonder at the beauty of it all. 

' ' Every ray of the ideal sent 
Into the heart destroys an evil there," 

Rostand has truly said; and for this reason 
we thank 1910 for their exquisite perform- 
ance of an exquisite play. They have given 
us something which lifts us out of the sordid 
materialism of every-day life, bringing us, for 
a time at least, in touch with the idealism and 
beauty of romance, leaving us much the 
better for the contact. We can think of no 
higher testimony of praise to give them than 
the fact that many among their audience re- 
turned home from the performance on the 
night of June 13, 1910, in absolute silence. 

Of the play itself we will say nothing, since 
it is not a product of Wellesley, except to 
commend 1910's taste in the selection of one 
of such surpassing beauty. We also wish to 
mention the beautiful translation by Miss 
Jewett of the song, composed by Rudel for 
the Princess, which was used in 1910's 
presentation. 

It has been some time since a play was 
given in Wellesley which displayed such an 
infinite amount of thought, such care for de- 
tails, both in acting and staging, and such a 
striving for realism. There was no member 
of the cast who did not read her lines with 
remarkable intelligence and feeling. If we 
did not at all times agree with their inter- 
pretation, yet they always at least inter- 
preted, which is more than can be said for 
many actors on the professional as well as 
the amateur stage. 

The background acting was particularly 
well managed. There is so often a tendency 
to develop carefully the leading characters 
and allow the minor and non-speaking 
characters — a very important element in a 
perfect production — to go uncared for. But 
this comment cannot be made here. Realism 
was the keynote of all the action. When a 
man was supposed to be thrown overboard 
into the water, he was thrown overboard and 
went into the water. In the matter of 
scenery no effort was spared which might 
make the effect more beautiful or more real, 
the lake-shore is so wonderfully adapted for 
staging the play, and we commend^i9io's 
cleverness in using this natural advantage. 
(Continued on page 4.) 



Float was held this year on the evening of 

Tuesday, June the 14th, in College Hall ' 
Seven o'clock saw most of I itol 

seated in the cove, the classes in appointed 
groups around the class "transparem 
and many of the guests on the grand stand, 
banked with green. The campus surround- 
ing Longfellow Pond and the cove was com- 
pletely decked with Japanese lanterns. 

At seven o'clock the exercises began with 
the parade of the college crew, the members 
of which are as follows: Captain, Winifred 
Finlay; Coxswains, Margery Hoyt and 
Marjorie Wyatt; Ruth Elliott, Constance 
Eustis, Winifred Finlay, Marguerite Fitz- 
gerald, Grace Hartley, Cecelia Hollings- 
worth, Ethelwynne Jones, Edith Midwood, 
Helen Owen, Hazel Rhodes, Anna Skinner 
and Dorothy Summy. 

Following this was the parade of the vari- 
ous class crews, each flying the class colors. 
During the parade of the crews, music was 
played by the band, and lights thrown' upon 
them by the huge illuminators from the 
shore. When each crew had displayed to ad- 
vantage its oarsr ..riship, Margery HoyT] 
head of rowing, announced that the indi- 
vidual cup, given by a member of the Senior 
class for the best all-round oarsmanship on 
the lake, had been awarded to Constance 
Eustis. In the absence of Miss Eustis the 
silver loving-cup was presented to Anna 
Skinner, captain of the 1911 crew. The 
announcement was received with tremendous 
cheering, particularly by the Class of 191 1, 
who cheered both Miss Eustis and the un- 
known "giver." 

Then followed the event of the evening as 
far as oarsmanship was concerned, — the 
formation of the W. In doing this the crews 
showed a marked improvement in agility 
and form. When the formation was made, 
the four crews sang the 1909 prize step-song, 
and '"Neath the Oaks," while colored lights 
were thrown on them by the illuminators 
from the shore. 

Very soon tiny twinkling lights were seen 
rounding Tupelo Point, which, as they came 
nearer, were seen to be the myriad Japanese 
lanterns with which the boats forming the 
pageant were decorated. The entire pageant 
was Japanese, each boat being trimmed with 
lanterns, and the occupants in the costumes 
of the land of cherry blossoms. The figures 
represented were in brief: Heralds, guards, 
Japanese deities, sun goddess and her at- 
tendants, sea god and his attendants, mu- 
sicians, the Mikado and chief courtiers, the 
court and musicians, guards and Kodania. 
(Continued on page 4.) 



SHAKE SPEAR E \>LA\ . 

On Wednesday evening, June 15. 1910, in 
Rhododendron Hollow, the Sh 

ty gave a very charming ; - :i of 

that delightful comedy. "The Win- 

The "Greenwoode" afforded a 
itiful setting for the play, which the 
gave with all its Shakespearian fr 

The performance was gracefully ushered in 
he recitation of the Prologue by K 
Cushman. president of the society. The cast 
wa< on the whole exceedingly good, their 
work showing the effects of careful study and 
training. The difficult role of Leontcs. King 
of Sieilia, was excellently filled by Katherine 
Tern,-. Without at any time losing control 
of her dignity of bearing, without at any time 
resorting to "ranting." she was able to con- 
vey to her audience an impression of ' 
passionate intensity which was very con- 
vincing. Her work in the latter part of the 
play was particularly commendable. Her 
voice was excellent throughout. 

Dorothy Straine presented Hermione with 
dignity and restraint, a dignity, however. 
which amounted at rimes lost:: .ugh 

the effort to make itself heard her voice 
occasionally lacked flexibility. 

As Polixenes, Genevieve Kraft was a 
trifle self-conscious in the first part of the 
play, but worked up well toward the close. 
Her best acting was perhaps in Scene IV 
of Act IV with Florizel. 

Katharine McGill as Florizel and Grace 
Hendrie as Perdita were a very charming 
couple. Grace Hendrie's performance was 
full of grace, freshness and spontaniety. 
Facial expression, gesture and voice were all 
very delightful. Katherine McGill gave con- 
vincingly the youthful ardor of Florizel, and 
lent to the play the joyous flavor of romance. 

With the exception of the work of Kath- 
erine Terry the best acting in the per. 
formance was probably done by Agnes Gil- 
son as the rogue Autolycus. She seemed 
fairly alive with the fun and enjoyment of her 
role and carried her audience with her. 
Her make-up, movements, expressi n 
voice intonations abounded in the spirit of 
good comedy. 

Jeannette Vail gave a very realistic inter- 
pretation of the bustlingly independent, 
large-hearted Paulina. Minnie Muirhead 
was a charmingly elfish Prince Mamillius. 
Camitlo, played by Mary Hewett. and 
Antigonus, by Harriet Marston. were both 
rather unconvincing, though Antigonus' 
mild manner at times formed a delightfully 
humorous contrast to that of his wife Paulina. 
The role of the old shepherd, reputed father 
of Perdita. was very well given by Persis 
(Continued on page 4.) 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College IRews. 

PACSS Or N. A* LlNDSEY &. CO., BOSTON 



Published weekly. Subscription price, SI. 00 a 
year to resident and non-resident. 

All business correspondence should be addressed 
to El?jeabeth Nofsinger, Business Manager, College 
News. 

All subscriptions should be sent to Miss Alice 
R. Porter. 

All advertising correspondence should be addressed 
to Miss B. M. Beckford, Wellesley. 



Editor-in-Chief, Imogene Kelly, 1911 

Associate Editor, Muriel Bacbeler, 1912 

Literary Editors, 

Cathrene H. Peebles, 1912 Carol Williams, 1912 

Mildred Washburn, 1912 Mary Burd, 1912 

Aluhnjb Editor, Elisabeth W. Manwarlng, 1902 

BmiNESs Manager, Elisabeth Nofsinger, 1910 

Subscription Editor, Alice R. Porter, 1910 

AftllflTA NTS 

Rldlo Gulon, 1911 Frances Gray, 1912 



"Entered as second class matter, November 12, 
1903, at the Post Office at Wellesley, Mass., under 
the Act of Congress. Maroh 3, 1879." 



HDIT0RIAL. 



The Editor has racked her brain and torn 
her hair and ground her teeth in despair. 
It was her desire that this last editorial of the 
year be an edifying one — one that should 
uplift and inspire! And yet, she must not 
preach! Alas, the difficulties in her way have 
been numerous. She chose the extremely 
original idea of talking about ways of spend- 
ing the summer, and wrote a lengthy disser- 
tation full of much valuable and sage advice. 
This, however, was relegated to the waste- 
basket. Its admirable qualities were much 
too fine to be wasted on an unappreciative 
multitude, already delightfully beginning an 
idyllic vacation; they would turn away in 
disgust at the impertinence of the College 
News, thrusting itself upon them, and de- 
manding that their ideas of pleasure should 



We carry an Immense line 
of 

NOVELTIES 

IN 

Jewelry and Silver 

at Very Low Prices. 

We especially call attention 

to goods suitable as gifts 

for all occasions. 



Roman's flDeMcal College 

of TPenns^lrania 

Sixtieth Annual Session. Thorough Course. 
Four years. Exceptional Facilities for Laboratory 
and Bedside Instruction. Post-Graduate Courses in 
Operative Gynaecology ; in Obstetrics, the Eye, Ear, 
Nose and Throat. A new hospital building in course 
of erection. Full particulars in catalogue. 

CLARA MARSHALL, M.D., Dean 

Box 900, 21st St. and North College Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 



DR. L. D H. FULLER 
DENTIST 

N»xt to Wellesley Inn Tel. 145-2 

Hours: 8.30—5.30 Daily, Tuesdays excepted 



141 



SUMMER ST. 
Next Hovey's 



Wholesale ! 
Retail 



be revolutionized. No — decidedly that was 
not a tactful subject. And yet the editor 
cannot escape from thoughts of summer 
Half-formed ideas- pursue and haunt her — 
until at last, reluctantly, she begins to write 
— with a fine disregard of the Giant Bromide 
looming up beside her desk, and a last re- 
linquishment of all hopes of "edifying" her 
readers. 

It would be an interesting study in indi- 
vidualities to find out how each one of us 
is going to spend her vacation. (The editor 
is musingly following her train of thought. 
Forgive her if she rambles.) One could 
almost divide us into types. Yet the News 
avoids any delineation or remarks. It 
takes for granted that we know better than 
anyone else how to get the most out of the 
three months ahead of us. If loafing is 
going to help us to take up college work in 
the fall with a new enthusiasm, let us loaf, 
by all means. There are delightful possi- 
bilities in loafing — if we don't monopolize 
the hammock at the expense of the rest of 
the family! Or, on the other hand, if we 
think that a lazy summer will be followed by 
a correspondingly lazy indifferent year at 
college, let us be as energetic as we can 
enjoy being, and get pleasure out of our 
systematic work — whether it be reading, 
writing, or a vacation school. 

After all, a good part of our enjoyment of 
the summer rests upon our sense of pro- 
portion. That is a quality which is sadly 
lacking in many college girls, for we seem 
slow in becoming acclimated, as it were. 
As we change from the big, noisy, rollicking 
college world, to the quieter one of our homes, 
we are perhaps not quick to adapt ourselves. 
Our voices sound strangely loud in the quiet 
dining-rooms, and the family informs us, 
a trifle sarcastically, that none of them are 
afflicted with deafness. We are so used, here 
at college, to going independently on our 
own way, to getting our own interests at- 
tended to, and disregarding those of our 
associates, that we are a little likely to forget 
how different are our home relations, and 
even at times to leave the family out of our 
calculations. 

And our families — perhaps many of us 
don't appreciate and enjoy them as we 
should. Our first days at home we spend in 
talk, chiefly — we ourselves doing the talking, 
and the family doing the listening. Sympa- 
thetic listening is a boon and delight to any- 



one, especially to us from college; — for often 
there wc want someone who will listen and 
be interested, instead of insisting on interpo- 
lating experiences of her own. Selfish wc 
all are, no doubt, in our desire to talk — 
all but the family. They listen to us, give 
us full sway. And often we requite them by 
rather consciously adopting a pose. They 
rarely show if they are amused, however, 
these nice people of our homes; they may 
smile to themselves at our sophisticated airs, 
but to us, they are all interest and sympathy. 
Here's to our families, individually and 
collectively ! With this last burst of enthu- 
siasm, the News bids farewell to the college 
for the summer. College is best, but home 
is better — ungrammatical, though true: And 
the News adds to its "Good-bye," a "good 
luck," not only for the summer, but for the 
fall as well, whether you are back at Wellesley 
or out in the "wide, wide world." 



Would it be an unfeasible scheme to limit 
the number of tickets sold for Float Night ? 
This night is surely the least enjoyable of 
our college holidays and its ' ' picnic ' ' charac- 
ter seems to increase from year to year. 
It is impossible to say how many of the 
guests at Float obtain tickets. There were 
crowds of people here that night who had 
very evidently no connection with any 
college girls, people who tramped helter 
skelter over the campus, over the seeded 
ground, scattering paper and acting as 
though Wellesley were a sort of large amuse- 
ment park turned over to their use. Some 
action ought surely to be taken in the future 
that this occasion may remain a night for the 
college and its guests, and not become a 
miniature replica of Revere Beach festivities. 



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COLLEGE NEWS 



MEXICAN INDIAN BLANKETS. 

THE NEWEST THING for your College Room, Den, Library or 
Music Room; for Canoes, Rugs, Couch Covers, Portieres and 
W«u Decorations. GORGEOUS COLOR EFFECTS. BEAUTI- 
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SENT ANYWHERE, CARRIAGE PREPAID, ON RECEIPT OF PRICE. 
ORDER TO-DAY. MONEY BACK IF YOU WANT IT. 

MEXICAN BLANKET CO., Aguascalientes, Mexico. 




LITERARY NOTE. 



A complete collection of the poems of Sophie Jewell will lie pub- 
lished in the autumn by Thomas Y. Crowell & Company, who 
brought out in 1908 her translation of the Middle-English poem, 
"The Pearl." The volume will include the lyrics, sonnets, and 
rondeaus, which first appeared in book form under the title "The 
Pilgrim and other Poems," 1896; the poems printed in "Persephone," 
1905, by the Department of English Literature of Wellesley College; 
those published more recently in different magazines, and a number 
of hitherto unpublished poems. Among these is a translation of 
the greater part of DAnnunzio's "The Daughter of Jorio." The 
same firm has published Miss Jewett's last prose work, "God's 
Troubadour," the story of St. Francis of Assisi told for children. 
The author spent several months in Italy for the purpose of getting 
material for this book at first hand. Photographs taken at Assisi 
and other places with which St. Francis is associated form a large 
part of the illustrations with which the book is embellished. The 
volume is now on sale in the college bookstore. 



REPORT OF WELLESLEY CONCERT FUND. 



H. C. Macdougall, in account with the Wellesley Concert Fund, 
1909-10. 

DR. 

Balance in Wellesley National Bank from 1908-1909 $ 42.78 

From sale of tickets 1,195.50 

Interest 3.16 

Received from friends of the college 1 1 1 . 1 8 

Total receipts §1,352.62 

CR. 

To artists $1,250.00 

To printing 76.50 

To flowers 9.00 

To incidentals 17.12 

Total expenditures §1,352.62 

Wellesley, June 15, 1910. 
I hereby certify that I have examined the foregoing account and 
find the same to be correctly cast and properly vouched. 

(Signed) 

George Gould, 

Auditor. 



THE CONSIGNORS' UNION, Inc. 

FOOD SHOP 48 Winter Street, Boston LUNCH ROOM 

LUNCHEON il to 3 

AFTERNOON TEA 3 to 5 

Cake, Pastry, Bread, Etc., on Sale 



Individuality and style in footwear are always of im- 
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attractive display, introducing many new styles which will 
be used by all smart dressers for immediate spring wear. 



THAYER, McINEIL & HODGKINS, 

47 TEMPLE PLACE 15 WEST STREET 

BOSTON 



COLLEGE NOTES. 



On Thursday afternoon, June 15. Estlvr Randall and Cornelia 
Fenr.o gave a reception at the Phi Sigma house for Seniors and their 
guests. A fairly large number were present, and a delightful time 
enjoyed by all. 

On account of the rain, the Glee Clu ' was held in 

College Hall Chapel on Friday evening. 

The last step singing of the year was on Monday evening. It 
was especially enjoyable because of the large number of alumn.e 
present. 

The leader of the ( lice Club for next year is Harriet Coman; the 
new president is Gertrude Rugg. 

The department of Hygiene and Physical Education announces 
the following final appointments from the class of 1910: 

Merriam Walters, Rockford College. Illinois. 

Marion Perkins, William Penn High School. Philadelphia. 

Minnie McNelly. High School. Springfield, Massachusetts. 

The demand for teachers from this department far exceeds the 
supply. 



THEATER NOTES. 



Tremont: "The Girl in the Taxi." 

Park: William Hodge in "The Man from Home.' 

Majestic: "The Colleen Bawn." 

Castle Square: "The Mikado." 



ART NOTES. 



Museum of Fine Arts: Syracusan Coins. 
Vose's Gallery: Summer Exhibition. 
Doll and Richards': Summer Exhibition. 
Arts and Crafts: Exhibition of Jewelry. 



A Fussy Package 

contains eighteen kimds 
of Whitman's super ex- 
tra chocolates as follows : 
Chocolate-covered White 
Nougat, Hard Nougat, 
Cream Walnuts, Cream 
Pecans, Amaracenes, 
Caramels, Almonds, Fil- 
berts, Double Walnuts, 
Brazil Nuts, Pecans, 
Marsh mallows, Almond 
Rock, Molasses Blecks, 
Nut Brittle, Nut Mo- 
lasses Chips, Fussy Nut 
Brickie ts, Blossoms of 
Solid Chocolate. 

N. CLARK CLEMENT 

SOlf AGENT FOR WfllfSlEY 




COLLEGE NEWS 



COOK'S RESTAURANT 

88 BOYLSTON STREET 

Next to Colonial Theater 



Matinee Lunches 



Wigs, Beards, Switches, Curls, Puffs, Etc., to Hire for Amateur Theatricals and 
all Stage Productions. Grease, Paints, Powders, Burnt Cork, Rouges, Etc. 

M. G. SLATTERY IEg A 2» WIGS 

226 TREMONT STREET - - - BOSTON 

Between Eliot and LaGrange Sts., Opp. Majestic Theater 

Competent Make-up Artists Special Attention Given 

Furnished to Order Work 

Tel. Oxford 657-1 

(Continued from page 1.) 

SENIOR PLAY. 



The costumes also were obviously planned with great care for cor- 
rectness and beauty. 

To speak individually of the leading members of the cast, we 
cannot praise too highly the splendid work of Gertrude Carter in her 
presentation of the Princess Melissinde. Resplendent in appear- 
ance, she carried her role with a dignity and control and with a 
depth of passionate earnestness which are seldom seen. Her every 
movement was the very essence of grace; her facial expression re- 
markable, her voice at all times full and melodious. 

Dorothy Binney, in the companion role of Bertrand d'Alla- 
manon, though essentially different, wasequally excellent. Wecan 
give her no higher praise than to say that she was a poet, a knight 
and a lover. Her acting was full of buoyancy, grace and poetry. 
She was at her best in the second and third acts in the scenes with 
Melissinde. Here her dramatic intensity was remarkable. She 
seemed to feel and live the part and carried her audience with her. 

The difficult role of Joffroy Rudel, with its pathos, its earnest- 
ness, its passion, was excellently played by Berniee Williams. She, 
too, seemed to feel and live the part and made it very realistic. 

As Squarciafico, Dorothea Taussig was a splendid example of 
the submerging of one's own personality in that of the character as- 
sumed. Her work in the difficult scene where she communicated the 
news of Bertrand's approach to Melissinde was particularly note- 
worthy. Miss Taussig's ability was of a truly professional order. 

Father Trophime was presented by Alice Porter with great 
dignity and nobleness. Her rendering of her lines was particularly 
beautiful. 

1 9 io has made a brilliant ending to their dramatic career in 
Wellesley, and has given the rest of the college a pleasure which will 
remain with us long after they have left us. 

The cast and committee were as follows: 
Melissinde, a Princess of Orient, Countess of Tripoli, 

Gertrude M. Carter 
Joffroy Rudel, Prince of Blaze, a troubadour from Aquitaine, 

Berniee Williams 
Bertrand d'AUamanon, a knight and troubadour from Provence, 

Dorothy Binney 

Father Trophime, the prince's chaplain Alice R. Porter 

Erasmus, the prince's physician Rosalind K. Ach 

Squarciafico, a Genoese tradesman Dorothea Taussig 

Sorismonde, a lady of honor to Melissinde Meredith Riddle 

Marines, on Rudel's galley, musicians, slaves, pilgrims, court ladies 

and children. 

Committee: Marie L. Kasten, Chairman; Harriet M. Chase, 
Marion A. Mason, Grace E. McDonald, Helen A. Wallis, Jean P. 
Winslow. Coach: Mrs. Christabel Kidder. 



(Continued from page 1.) 

"FLOAT." 



For its size the pageant was very effective, coming up slowly near 
the shore and then coming around to form a background for the 
crews, of bobbing lanterns, waving fans and sparkling lights of yel- 
low, red and green. 

When the pageant had ceased the crews sang "Lake Waban," 
and the four class and crew songs, with the step-song and Alma 
Mater. The singing was unusually unified and hearty, and with the 
various lights thrown upon the W, made a very effective scene. 
The announcement was made by Miss Hoyt that the head of rowing 
for next year was Marjorie Wyatt. 

The last event of the evening was the christening of the 1 91 3 
boat, performed by Mary Colt, president of the class. Miss Colt, 



The Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume 

COTRELL & LEONARD 

ALBANY, N. V. 

Makers of the 

Caps, Gowns and Hoods 

to Wellesley, Radcliffe, Mount Holyoke, 
Bryn Mawr, Barnard, Woman's College 

of Baltimore, Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Cornell, Univ. 

of Pa., Dartmouth, Brown, Williams, Amherst, Colorado 

College, Standford and the others. 

CORRECT HOODS FOR ALL DEGREES 

Illustrated Bulletin and Samples on request 




attired in a Japanese costume of pale blue and pirHc, was rowed out in 
a boat banked with pine boughs and iris-blue flowers. Removing the 
cloth which concealed the name of the boat, she rose, christening it 
"The Iris," and tossing a bouquet of flowers to the 1913 crew. 

The usual fireworks at Float were omitted, and the evening's 
entertainment was closed by the sale of refreshments and a concert 
by the band. 

The crews are as follows: 



Captain, Edith Midwood. 
Coxswains, Margery Hoyt, 

Port. 
Stroke, Edith Midwood 
Stroke or 6, Lucy Bacon 
6, Esther Johnson 
4, Ruth Elliott 
2 or 4, Helen Owen 
2, Dorothy Dey 

Captain, Anna Skinner. 
Coxswains, Mariorie Wyatt 

Port. 
Stroke, Constance Eustis 
Stroke or 6, Anna Skinner 
6 or 4, Ernestine Howard 
4, Helen Slagle 
2, Sarah Baxter 
2 or 4, Edith Hall 



1910. 

Meriam Carpenter. 

Starboard. 
7, Winifred Finlay 
7 or 5, Ernestine Rhein 
5, Katharine Scott 
3, Hazel Rhodes 
Bow or 3, Elsie Jamieson 
Bow, Edith Proctor 



1911. 

and Catharine Hunter. 
Starboard. 
7, Marguerite Fitzgerald 
7 or 5, Grace Hartley 
5, Alberta Peltz 
3 or 5, Ruth Thompson 
3, Meta Bennett 
Bow, Madeline Andrews 

1912. 



Captain, Laura E. S. Griswold. 

Coxswains, Frances Gray and Dorothy G. Henderson. 



Port. 


Starboard. 


Stroke, Cecilia Hollingsworth 


7, Ethelwynne Jones 


6, Dorothy Summy 


5 or 7, Corinne Searle 


6, Helen Batcheller 


3, Mildred Keim 


4, Dorothy Bowden 


Bow, Lura E. S. Griswold 


4 or 6, Dorothv Hart 




2, Mildred Fenner 




2, Ruth Hobbs 




2, Marian Butler 






913- 


Captain, Marian Rider. . 




Coxswains, Dorothy Ridgway 


and Edith Wilbur. 


Port. 


Starboard. 


Esther Balderston 


Geraldine Howarth 


Marian Bradley 


Dorothy Raymond 


Helen Farrar 


Marian Rider 


Helen Green 


Daphne Seldon 


Ada Harring 


Margaret Wilson 


Helen Homer 


Mabel Winslow 


C Continue 


d from page 1.) 


SHAKESPEARE PLAY. 



Pursell. As his son, the clown, Dorothy Mills, was very realistic 
and delightfully funny. The minor roles were all well taken , none of 
them obtruding themselves upon the audience at any time; the 
interlude was especially well rendered by Charlotte Lyman as Father 
Time. 

Mention should be made of the careful attention to details of 
setting, costumes, and so on; also of the dancing, which was ex- 
ceedingly pretty. We all wish to thank the Shakespeare Society for 
a very delightful evening. 

(Continued on page 5.) 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SHAKESPEARE PLAY— Continued. 

The casl of the play was as follows: 

Leontes, King of Sicilia Katherine Terry 

Mamillius, young Prince of Sicilia Minnie Muirhead 

Camillo 1 f Mary Hewett 

Antigonus f T , f c - ■•• I Harriet Marston 

.-,, & four Lords ot Sicilia . .,„ i,r , , . 

( leomenes j I Jean Weber 

Dion I I Lucile Kroger 

Polixenes, King of Bohemia Genevieve Kraft 

Plorizel, Prince of Bohemia Katharine MeGill 

Archidomus, a Lord of Bohemia Mildred Frink 

Old Shepherd, reputed father of Perdita Persis Pursell 

Clown, his son Dorothy Mills 

Antolycus, a rogue Agnes Gilson 

A gaoler ; Elsie West 

Hermione, Queen to Leontes Dorothy Straine 

Perdita, daughter to Leontes and Hermione Grace Hendrie 

Paulina, wife of Antigonus Jeannette Vail 

Emilia, a lady attending Hermione .Helen Owen 

Mopsa ) ~ ' , j j Ridie Guion 

Dorcas f Shepherdesses j Mary christie 

Other lords and gentlemen, ladies, officers, guards, servants, shep- 
herds and shepherdesses. 
Coach: Mrs. Henry Hicks of the Emerson College of Oratory. 



GLEE CLUB CONCERT. 

On account of the rain which prevented Senior Dramatics on 
Friday evening, the Musical Club's concert was given on June 17, 
at 7.30 P.M., in College Hall Chapel. The concert was highly 
successful, the program interest being on the whole better sustained 
than it was last February. 

Several numbers were especially well rendered. The pure 
lyric quality of Browning's Spring was beautifully brought out in 
its singing; the words were clear, and never lost in the music. The 
swing of the Strauss waltz was an unmixed delight, and the medley 
by the Mandolin Club was full of snap and spirit. " La Granadina," 
by the Mandolin Club, was excellent. "The Coppah Moon" was 
done almost as well by this particular girls' club as it could have 
been done by men, but the "Barcarolle," by the Glee Club, ac- 
companied by mandolins, was rather too ambitious an attempt. 
The encores were excellently done; Florian's "Love Song" was 
especially enjoyable because of its clearness and sweetness. 

The program was as follows : 

First Part. 

1. a. Neath the Oaks. 

b. The Year's at the Spring Mrs. H. H. A. Beach 

Glee Club. 
(Encore: My Honey Frank Lynes) 

2. The Moose P. Hans Flath 

Mandolin Club. 
(Encore: Oribiribin A. Pestalozza) 

3. Waltz Song Richard Strauss 

Glee Club. 
(Encore: Cobwebs Gerrit Smith) 

4. Yellow Jonquils Paul Johanning 

Mandolin Club. 
(Encore: Chinese March Fleige) 

5. a, Daffodils King Hall 

b. Snowflakes Cowen-Gaul 

Glee Club. 

6. Medley arr. Lansing 

Mandolin Club. 

Second Part. 

1 . La Granadina Granado 

Mandolin Club. 

2. O, Wert Thou in the Cauld Blast H. C. MacDougall 

Glee Club. 
(Encore: Florian's Love Song B. Godard,) 

3. Serenade Barcarolle Monti 

Mandolin Club. 
(Encore: Meteor (March) Rice) 



Telephone 
1356-3 Oxford 



Established 
1890 



CHARLES H. HURWITCH 

LADIES' 
TAILOR 



31 WEST STREET 



BOSTON 



WOMEN'S SWAGGER COATS 

PURE RUBBER 



Tan 

Black 

and 

Gray 

MANNISH 

EXTREME 

CLASSY 

Newest 
Knockabout 
Storm Rig 



For Sale By 

C. W. DAVIS 

Dry Goods Store 

WELLESLEY 



a. The Coppah Moon Harry Rowe Shelley 

b. Medley arr. H. C. MacDougall 

Glee Club. 

a. Barcolle Offenbach 

b. Alma Mater. 

Mandolin and Glee Clubs. 

Mandolin Club Members. 
Leader, Ruth L. Blacker. 




First Mandolin: 
Dorothy A. Baldwin, u)ii. 
Esther H. Dow, 1910 
Ruth A. Grinnell, 1911, 
Edith D. Haley, 191 1. 
Alice F. Morton, 1910, 
Mildred M. Wilson, 191 1 
Gretchen B. Harper, 1910. 

Second Mandolin: 
Frances A. Faunce, 191 2, 
Eleanor S. Hall, 1912, 
Lili M. Zimmerman, 1912. 

Third Mandolin: 
Florence W. Beals, 191 1, 



Marion \ T . Rice, 1911. 
(Continued on page 6.) 



Guitar: 
Ina Castle, iqio, 
Carrie M. Longanecker, 1911, 
Florence R. Mallory, hiio. 
Katharine Pardee. [912, 
E. Maxcy Robeson. 19II, 
Marioric M. Souk-. 1913. 

Violin: 
Helen M. Adair. 1910. 

Tenor Mandola: 
Artus James. 1913, 
Annie E. Williams. 1910. 

Bass Violin : 
Edith Sweetser, 1910. 



CHRISTIE 

Ladies 9 Hatter 

MILLINERY. SHIRTWAISTS. NECKWEAR, HOSIERY 

160 Trcmont Street, - - - Boston 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Joyflfefs 



CHOCOLATE 

BONBONS 



GOOD FOR GIFTS GOOD FOR GIRLS. 

416 Washington St. (4 Doors North of Summer St.) 



IDfenna jTSafterg 
anD Cafe 



Wellesley Spa 

Our Specialty FUDGE CAKE ^VS^ 

PACKED UP TO SEND BY EXPRESS TO ANY PART OF U. S. 

583 Washington Street, Opposite The Wellesley Inn 




GOLF 
SUPPLIES ™° E 



H.LFLAGGCO 



OLDNATICK INN 

South Natick, Mass. 
SPECIALTY DURING JUNE 
Iced Cocoa and Harvard Sandwiches. 
Breakfast before 9 
Dinner 1 to 2 
Supper 6.30 to 7.30 

Tel. Natick 9212 MISS HARRIS, Mer. 
JOHN A. MORGAN & CO. 

Pharmacists 

SHATTUCK BUILDING 
WELLESLEY 

WELLESLEY FRUIT STORE 
Wellesley Square 

(where the cars stop). Carries a full 
line of Choice Fruit, Confectionery and 
other goods, and Vegetables of all 
kinds usually found in a first-class 
fruit store. AIbo Olive Oil. Free 
Delivery. 
Tel. 138-2 GEORGE BARKAS. 

F. II. PORTER 

PLUMBER, Wellesley Square 

Dealer in Hardware 

Japalac and Mission Stains 

New Patterns for Brass Work 

Dry and Fancy Goods { 

Fine Underwear 
M AG U I R E 

The Norman, Wellesley Sq. 

ALICE Q. COOMBS, Wellesley '93 
Announce! the Opening of a 

Tea Room and food Salesroom 

in TAYLOR BLOCK 

Orders for Table Parties and Spreads 

Solicited 
Decorated Birthday Cakes a Specialty 

WRIGHT & DITSON 



GLEE CLUB CONCERT-Continued. 



nco. u. ». pat. ©"• 



Banjo: Tympanies: 

Dorothy P. Clark, 1913, Mildred M. Wilson, 1911. 

Marian T. Shoemaker, 1913, Director: 

M. Lillian Symonds, 1910. G. L. Lansing. 

Glee Club Members. 
Leader, Marjorie Snyder, 19 10. 

President, Gertrude R. Rugg, 191 1. 

Accompanist, Helen Bennett, 1910. 



First Soprano: 
Irma Bonning, 1910, 
Dorothy Bullard, 191 2, 
Helen Eaton, 191 2, 
Natalie Williams, 1913, 
Alice Wormwood, 1913. 

Second Soprano: 
Madeline Austin, 1912, 
Grace Kilborne, 1910, 
Ella Lownsbery, 191 1, 
Ruth Mulligan, 1911, 
Gertrude Rugg, 1911. 



First Alto: 
Alecia Brown, 1912, 
Louise Eppich, 1913, 
Lucy Roberts, 1912, 
Madaline Tillson, 191 1, 
Ruth Rodman, 191 2. 

Second Alto: 
Margaret Buckley, 1912, 
Carol Prentice, 1913, 
Ethel Rhoades, 1910, 
Ruth Tolman, 191 3, 
Marjorie Snyder, 19 10. 



PARLIAMENT OF FOOLS. 



'Twas midnight; and the camp- 

Us lay 
All starkly white in moon- 
Light's ray, 
The little birds on nim- 

Ble wing 
Began to gyre and then 

To sing — 
Or no, — beg pardon — I for- 

Got 
The sleepy birds they did 

It not, 
But anyway, all na- 

Ture said: 
"They're gone, they're gone, that 

Rabid throng! 
The zooish ones, the botanites, 

All gone!" 

"Staying for Commencement Day?" 

"Oh yes, won't it be fine, 
Exams, o'er, naught to do but play 

And call my minutes mine." 

My joy since then has taken wings, 

A Senior's slave I've been, 
Seen Roommate off, packed up her things, 

Met Mother, Dad and "Jim." 

Ten miles a day, o'er campus green 

I've trailed my feet so sore, 
The place to show, and likewise seen 

A hundred plays or more. 

Never again will I remain 

Here for Commencement week, 

Where one sees naught but trunks and rain, 
But depart with Freshmen meek. 



The Walnut Hill School 

NATICK, MASS. 

A College Preparatory Schoil for Girls 

Miss Conant and Miss Blgelew 
Principals 

HOLDEN'S STUDIO 

20 North Ave., Natfck 

High Grade Portraits 

Telephone 109-3 

Pianos for Rent 

D E RBY'8 
Piano Rooms 

Clark's Block, - Natick 

TAILBY 

THE WELLESLEY FLORIST 

Office, 555 Washington St. Tel. 44-a 

Conservatories, 103 Linden St. 

Tel. 44-1 

Orders by Mail or Otherwise are 

Given Prompt Attention. 

J. TAILBY & SON, Props. 

Wellesley, Mass. 

^e ^atrnn 3nn 

CHOPS, STEAKS, SALADS, 
COFFEE, CHOCOLATE, 

Always ready for 
Wellesley Students 



THE KANRICH BAND 
AND ORCHESTRA 

The IJest Musicians for All 

occasions. 

Orchestrations and Vocal 

Arrangements. 

ALBERT M. KANRICH 

164a Tremont St., Boston 

SMITH BROTHERS 

Butter, Cheese and Eggs 

2 and 4 New faneuil Hall Market 

BOSTON 

DR. M. O. NELSON 

©entist 

Room 4, Walcott Building 
Natick, Mass. 

Tel. Natick 101-12 



Miss 1= L,. Blissard 

3|air Brewing anb g>fmmpoomg 

TREATMENT OF THE HAIR AND SCALP A SPECIALTY 

jtlianicurtng, Cbiropo&p anD jfactal Massage 

The most scientific and latest approved instrument for giving 
the celebrated Vibratory Facial and Scalp Treatments 



Tel. 122- 



THE NORMAN, Over 1. B. Parker's Stoi SIck, WEllfSlfV, MASS. 



Jfleat anb Brink 

" To satisfy your thirst for knowledge 
And also keep from growing thin, 
Just register at Wellesley College 

And then attend the Wellesley Inn." 



COLLEGE NEWS 




y< 



& 






Polo, Golf and Tennis Requisite!. 



i j 



+. 



We Invite Your Attention to Our 

ACKET SWEATERS 

Indispensable for Riding, Driving and 

Field -Sports of all kinds. 

Made in all colors. 

^y^ ^o Washington and 

T/Si/tJ AZ> ?#% Summer Streets, 

f ? . ' Beaton. U.S.A. 



TO THE UNDER-CLASSMAN. 

Are you given to speculation — 

Or to serious contemplation? 

Consider, then, what you would do 

If you were a Senior, too, 

Very different life would be! 

You'd be a celebrity, 

Frcshman'd eye with awe your tears, 

As you'd talk of your "careers." 

You'd look interesting and pale, 
Worn out by hard work — and frail. 
And those exams, that you'd been through- 
They'd make you quite a martyr, too. 

THE WAIL OF A PAPA. 

Yes, dear, the walks are lovely, 
— Is that ear line very far? — 

bo those are the rhododendrons! 
— Oh, for a good cigar! 

I'm feeling ver)' weary, 

— And that's the famous lake!— 

The weather here, my daughter dear, 
Is hot em nigh to bake. 

We're going to the West Woods? 

Another pretty sight? 
But business calls me now, my dear, 

To Boston for the night. 



BACCALAUREATE SUNDAY. 



THE HOUGHTON MEMORIAL CHAPEL. 

ORDER OF MORNING SERVICE. 

Eleven O'clock. 
Service Prelude. 
Processional, Ancient of Days, 
Invocation. 
Hymn 9. 

Anthem: Te. Deum, 
Responsive Reading, Selection 40. 
Gloria Patri. 
Scripture Lesson. 

Pastoral Prayer (Response by the choir). 
Hymn 822. 



PARLIAMENT OF FOOLS— Continued. 



Jeffrey 



H. C. M. 



Bailey, Banks & Biddle Co. 



MAKERS 01 



Class Emblems for Wellesley College 

College Organization! and Societies contemplating I he purchaie of Emblemi are 
invited to write for designs, lamples and pricei. With the workshops on lh« 
premiiei, thii Company ii enableJ to lurniih emblemi of the beat gradt of work- 
manship and finish at the lowest prices consistent wiih work of this high quality. 

College and School Emblems 

An Illustrated Catalogue, 
Mailed free on Request 

1218-20-22 CHESTNUT ST., PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 



Sermon, by Dr. Francis Brown. 



Prayer. 

Hymn. 
Benediction. 
Recessional Si 3. 

ORGAN RECITAL. 

Three ( f clock. 

ORDER OF EVENING SERVICE. 

Seven < I'clock. 

Service Prelude. 

Processional 7S9. 

Invocation. 

Hymn 928. 

Anthem (Women's Voices), God in Nature, 

Psalm 136. 

Gloria Patri. 

.Scripture Lesson. 

Address by the I 'resident. 

Prayer. 

Violoncello: Reverie. 

Choir: Gallia, 



Franz Schubert 



Emil Dunkler 
unod 

"Solitary lieth the city, she that was full 1 if pei iplc! How is she 
widowed! She that was great among nations, prin Dg t he- 

provinces. How is she put under tribute! Sorely she weecpth in 
darkness, her tears are on her cheeks and no one offereth consolation. 
Yes, all her friends have betrayed her, they are become her enemies. 
Zion's ways do languish, none come to her solemn fe< sts. All her 
gates are desolate, her priests sigh, yes, her virgil fflicledand 

she is in bitterness. Is it nothing to all ye that pa.ss by? B 
and see if there be any sorrow like unto my sorrow. Now behold. (» 
Lord, look Thou on my affliction: see the foe hath magnified himself. 

Jerusalem! ( I turn thee to the Lord. Thy God." 

Violoncello: Song without Words, D. Van G 

Traumerei, R. Schumann 

Organ: Reverie, L. 11. Lemare 

Prayers (with choral responses). 
Recessional 929. 

THE WELLESLE1 COLLEGE CHOIR. 

(Miss Alice Smart, Solo). 
Assisted by 

Mr. Leon van Vliet, Violoncello; 

Messrs. Ilobbs, Hodsdon, Holden and Tripp. Tei - 
Messrs. Doane, Snyder. Steele and Whitten, ! ; 
Professor Macdougall, Organist. 



PRESIDENT HAZARD'S RECEPTION. 



Very persistent showers caused the Senior play n up 

for the night of Saturday, June the eighteenth; so Pn lent Hazard 
very kindly changed the date of her reception, in order to give 
another chance for the play on Monday evening. Presidf nt Hazard, 
assisted by Dean Pendleton, received in the Browning room at 
College Hall, and crowds of interested guests rilled College Hall 
center and overflowed into the various p; rlors. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



WOMEN'S SHOES 

This is a Tan Season and We are Well Supplied with Them 

The Women's Shoe Section now occupies a large and spacious part of 
our Third Floor, Main Building* It is the finest appointed shoe section east 
of Chicago, containing all the newest features pertaining to the correct 
choosing and fitting of footwear with the least inconvenience. A special 
feature of this section is its secludedness, occupying as it does, a space 
separate from the main selling floor where women customers are enabled to 
make their selection in perfect comfort, without intrusion of any sort. 

All the newest ideas for spring and summer wear are here in a variety to fulfil all 
the shoe requirements of smart dressers. 

Especially noticeable is the seamless street pump with up-to-date leather bows and 
one hole Eclipse ties with ribbon bows. Also the newest effects in leather buckles and plain 
toes and tips with and without ankle straps. Whatever your shoe needs may be you will 
find satisfactory selection from our immense stock. We have shapes and lasts to satisfy all 
tastes from the conservative to the extreme. 



"Hypatia" Grade Shoes 3.50 and 4.00 



'Custom Grade" Shoes 5.00 and 6.00 



JORDAN MARSH COMPANY, 



ALUMN/E NOTES. 



In addition to notes concerning graduates, the Alumnae 
column will contain items of interest about members of the 
Faculty, past and present, and former students. 



Miss Sara McLauthlin, T903, has been visiting Mrs. M. Gard- 
ner Talcott (Catherine Knodel, 1903), in Arizona. 

Miss Ruth Eager, 1902, is to teach English next year in Putnam 
Hall, Poughkeepsie, New York. 

Miss Ernestine Miller, 1903, finished her work on the Words- 
worth Concordance, last year. She expects next year to teach in 
Washington Seminary, Florida and Connecticut Avenues, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Miss Mary B. Pratt, Special 1889-91, will study next year at 
Columbia. 

Miss Anna Pitman, 1903, has been teaching for the past year 
in Carmel, New York. 

Miss Clare Raymond, 1903, is living in New York City and 
doing private accompanying for voice and violin. 

Miss Florence E. Beck, 1905, has taken a business position in 
Kansas City, after teaching five years in Forest Park University, 
St. Louis, Missouri. 

Miss Jessie Goff and Miss Faith Talcott, 1904, sailed, May 31, 
for Europe. 

Mrs. Alfred Graham (Louise Hunter, 1904), is expecting to 
live in Nice in winter and to spend part of her summers in Brittany. 
After October 1 her address will be 47 Boulevard Victor Hugo, 
Nice, South France. 

Mrs. Amos C. Sudler (Estelle Kramer, 1904), and her daughter, 
Carol, are spending the summer in Colorado with Mrs. Sudler's 
mother and sister. 

Miss Augusta List, 1909, has just completed the secretarial 
training course in the Los Angeles Young Women's Christian Asso- 
ciation. In the fall she will serve as student secretary for the 
Christian Associations of the Los Angeles Normal .School and of the 
University of Southern California, both in the city of Los Angeles. 

At the wedding of Claire Jaquith, 1906, the maid of honor was 
Emma Danforth, 1906. 

Miss Hester Frost, 1907, has been teaching for the past year at 
the Colorado Springs (Colorado) High School. 

Miss Olive Smith, 1907, received her M. A. degree from Co- 
lumbia this June. 

MARRIAGES. 

Bacon — Haines. Sixth month, fourteenth, 1910, in German- 
town, Pennsylvania, Rachel Sharp Haines, 1902, to Francis Llew- 
ellyn Bacon. 

Fowle — Jaquith. June 16, 1910, in Woburn, Massachusetts, 
Misp Claire Marie Jaquith, 1906, to Mr. Charles Warren Fowle. 
At home, Tower Cottage, Roumeli Hissar, Constantinople. 



DEATH. 

June 10, 1910, at Still River, Massachusetts, Mrs. Bateman, the 
mother of Eliza A. Bateman, 1894. 



CHANGES OF ADDRESS. 

Miss Janet M. Lambie, 1904, 743 Hill Avenue, Wilkinsburg, 
Pennsylvania. 

Miss Marjorie Lee, 1904, Berkshire Pass, Columbia County, 
New York. 

Miss Ruth Lincoln, 1904, 307 Broad Street, Norwich, New 
York. 

Mrs. William Brenton Boggs (Catherine Linn, 1904), 430 
Sterling Place, Brooklyn, New York. 

Miss Eleanor MacDonald, 1904, "The Hill," Washington 
Street, Portland, Oregon. 

Miss Jennie A. McKearin, 1904, 18 Tremont Street, Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts. 

Mrs. Frank Adams Howe (Sarah Marsh, 1904), 45 Fountain 
Street, Orange, Massachusetts. 

Miss Eleanor P. Monroe, 1904, 330 Gowen Avenue, Mount 
Airy, Pennsylvania. 

Mrs. Charles Warren Fowle (Claire Jaquith, 1906), American 
Embassy, Constantinople, Turkey, via London. 

Miss Belle Schlesinger, 1903, 2805 Michigan Avenue, Chicago, 
Illinois. 

Mrs. Milton P. Skinner (Clara Green, 1904), 32 Broadhead 
Avenue, Jamestown, New York. 

Miss Harriet Silsby, 1903, 19.. Holt Street, Fitchburg, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Mrs. Albert C. Hunt. (Helen Halley, 1904), 913 West Boulevard, 
Rapid City, South Dakota. 

Miss Dora Stoker, 1903, 644 Locust Street, Long Beach, 
California. 

Mrs. Robert Chapman, Jr. (Clarissa Hastings, 1904), 275 
Waltham Street, West Newton, Massachusetts. 

Miss Gertrude Thomas, 1903, 237 Granite Street, Quincy, 
IVI a sss c nu setts 

Mrs. Osborne V. Willson (Bertha Todd, 1903), 185 May Street, 
Aurora, Illinois. 

Mrs. Samuel A. Fletcher (Ruth Huntington, 1904), Box 295, 
East McKeesport, Pennsylvania. 

Miss Laura Hussey, 1904, 1810 Hobart Boulevard, Los Angeles, 
California. 

Mrs. Howell N. Baker (Maude Jessup, 1904), 2640 Budlong 
Avenue, Los Angeles, California. 

Mrs. Walter S. Tower (Lurena Wilson, 1903), 914 Farragut 
Terrace, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Mrs. Amos C. Sudler (Estelle Kramer, 1904), School Lane 
Apartments, corner School Lane and Pulaski, Germantown, Penn- 
sylvania.